Culture

Hurricane Dorian and Its Impact

by Ryaan Bhuiyan

Every year, there’s a huge hurricane that devastates small countries or even big countries like ours. Last year, there was Hurricanes Michael and Florence. The year before that, there were hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. This year, the only major hurricane so far has been Hurricane Dorian. Hurricane Dorian recently ran rampant through the Bahamas before climbing up the east coast. The Category 5 hurricane initially formed on August 24, 2019, and finally dissipated on September 12, 2019.

Hurricane Dorian had 1 minute sustained wind speeds of 185 miles per hour upon landfall on Elbow Cay, making it tied with the Labor Day hurricane of 1935 as the strongest landfalling hurricane in the Atlantic. Hurricane Dorian has had a massive impact on the Bahamas. Though the true death toll is unknown so far, there are 60 confirmed deaths, but news sources have suggested that the fatalities may have crossed 1,000 by now. As of now, there are around 1,300 people missing in the Bahamas, and the property damages have been estimated at a mountainous amount of more than 7.04 billion USD. Luckily, extensive measures were taken in Puerto Rico, some areas of which are still impacted by the disastrous Hurricane Maria (2017), and only 1 person died from Dorian. The impact on the United States and parts of Canada are still unknown, and there is no estimate for the damage. States of emergency and mass evacuations took place in the states of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia.

Hurricane Dorian has seemed to spark some controversy as well in the United States. On the first of September, Donald Trump tweeted that Alabama would be “hit much harder than anticipated” when in reality, eight National Hurricane Center forecast updates over the previous 24 hours showed Dorian steering well away from Alabama and moving up the Atlantic coast.

If you want to help, there are boxes outside some teachers’ rooms for donating goods to Dorian victims and hoping to provide them relief and hope in these troubling times for them.

Categories: Culture

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s